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Addressing Accountability Issues Including Comparability in the Design and Implementation of an Innovative Assessment and Accountability System

The Innovative Assessment and Accountability Demonstration Authority (hereafter known as the “innovative pilot” or the “Demonstration Authority”) provides states with an opportunity to collaborate with a sample of local districts to pilot a new kind of assessment and accountability system within the state. This system does not have to rely on statewide, standardized assessments as the sole indicator of student achievement, but instead may pilot different types of non-standardized assessments (e.g., instructionally embedded assessments, performance tasks) that may provide for some degree of local flexibility. Because states must incorporate assessment results from the pilot districts into the state accountability system alongside the results generated from the non-pilot districts, the assessment system must meet all of the same technical requirements as the state standardized assessments—e.g., alignment, validity, reliability, accessibility.2 Additionally, because the innovative pilot will take time to scale statewide, the state must ensure that the assessment systems are producing comparable results within pilot districts, among pilot districts, and importantly, across pilot and non-pilot districts.

The purpose of this brief is to support states in planning for a successful Demonstration Authority application by providing key conceptual and technical considerations related to promoting and evaluating comparability in an innovative assessment and accountability pilot. We begin with a discussion of alignment to the state’s theory of action so the pilot focuses on the intended goals of the system. Next, we define comparability in the era of ESSA flexibility, and lay the  groundwork for a common understanding of how evidence of comparability differs depending on the nature and use of the reported scores. We then delve deeply into how states could approach comparability from a design perspective, providing detailed examples of processes that states could use to support their intended comparability claims. We additionally provide descriptions of the state and local roles for ensuring comparability. Lastly, we provide a case study that details a key comparability practice from the innovative assessment and accountability system in New Hampshire.

Download the Brief: Addressing Accountability Issues Including Comparability in the Design and Implementation of an Innovative Assessment and Accountability System

View the full series of Innovative Assessment policy and practice briefs produced by KnowledgeWorks and the National Center for the Improvement of Educational Assessment (Center for Assessment).

Publication Date: 
Tuesday, July 26, 2016

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